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What we know about Project Nebula

Aston Martin’s concept photo for its future super car. Picture: Aston Martin

DETAILS about what is expected to be the fastest production car ever created have emerged in recent days.

Earlier in the year it was revealed that Aston Martin had been working on creating the fastest hypercar in the world. To do so the company forged a historic and secret partnership with Red Bull and its Formula 1 team.

Since then the two giants of automotive engineering have been quietly working away on what’s been dubbed ‘Project Nebula’.

The other name for what’s slated to be a “race car for the road” is AM-RB 001, and the world is slowly learning a little bit more about what to expect from the Aston Martin high performance vehicle.

F1 race engineer and beloved designer Adrian Newey is involved with the project and with the seemingly endless pile of cash Red Bull has to spend on ground-breaking projects, expectations are running high.

The hypercar will be limited to just 99 units, according to a report by Autocar. Such super cars are seldom manufactured in large numbers but the small figure came as somewhat of a surprise.

A ballpark figure for the cost the AM-RB 001 has also leaked with each car predicted to sell for between $3.9 million to $5.8 million.

The Aston Martin Vantge No95 driven by Marco Sorensen, Niki Thim both of Denmark, and Darren Turner of Britain in action during the free practice session of the 84th 24-hour Le Mans endurance race earlier this month. Picture: David Vincent/AP

The Aston Martin Vantge No95 driven by Marco Sorensen, Niki Thim both of Denmark, and Darren Turner of Britain in action during the free practice session of the 84th 24-hour Le Mans endurance race earlier this month. Picture: David Vincent/APSource:AP

The car is not due to launch until 2018 but last month the company showed small model designs to prospective buyers at the Monaco Grand Prix.

Aston Martin design chief Marek Reichman said the design is “incredibly pure, incredibly simple”.

The car will reportedly be a petrol-electric hybrid and the design will be focused on speed and as a result is expected to weigh little more than top-tier Le Mans prototype cars that just competed in the 24-hour endurance race known as “the Grand Prix of Endurance and Efficiency”.

Sale of the car will likely be localised to a handful of markets, given that regulations could prohibit its sale in some countries. Thus the 99 future editions of the car are expected to predominantly end up in Europe and the Middle East.

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