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Doctor ‘killed his wife’ to be with lover

Brian Crickitt, pictured with his wife Christine, who was found dead on the couple’s bedroom floor on New Year’s Day, 2010.

A DOCTOR accused of murdering his wife to be with his new lover “held hands” with her as the couple visited his wife’s body at the morgue, a court has heard.

Sydney GP Dr Brian Crickitt is on trial for allegedly murdering Christine Crickitt, 61, by injecting her in the buttock with fast-acting insulin on New Year’s Eve almost seven years ago.

Dr Crickitt, 63, has pleaded not guilty to murdering his wife inside their home at Woodbine in southwestern Sydney between 8pm on December 31, 2009 and 8.15am on January 1, 2010.

NSW Crown prosecutor Mark Tedeschi, QC, told the Supreme Court on Wednesday that Dr Crickitt had several motives for murder, including his wife’s $500,000 life insurance policy.

In his opening address, Mr Tedeschi said that the GP had embarked on “an intensely emotional relationship” with Linda Livermore and had suggested they marry.

“For some years prior to her death, their relationship had become quite toxic and it was quite clear that the accused was deeply unhappy in his marriage,” Mr Tedeschi told the court.

Dr Brian Crickitt (above) is on trial in the NSW Supreme Court for allegedly murdering his wife with fast-acting insulin. Picture: News Corp

Dr Brian Crickitt (above) is on trial in the NSW Supreme Court for allegedly murdering his wife with fast-acting insulin. Picture: News CorpSource:News Limited

Dr Brian Crickitt (above, right) is accused of murdering his wife to gain her insurance policy and start a new life with his lover, Linda Livermore. Picture: News Corp

Dr Brian Crickitt (above, right) is accused of murdering his wife to gain her insurance policy and start a new life with his lover, Linda Livermore. Picture: News CorpSource:News Limited

Chrstine Crickitt (above) died on New Years Eve 2009 and her body was discovered in her home at Woodbine, southeastern Sydney.

Chrstine Crickitt (above) died on New Year’s Eve 2009 and her body was discovered in her home at Woodbine, southeastern Sydney.Source:Supplied

Mr Tedeschi said Dr Crickitt, who was treating his wife for some of her illnesses, either forcibly administered insulin via a syringe or lied to his wife about the medication and she agreed, thinking it was a legitimate treatment.

Two days earlier, Dr Crickitt had done a Google search on “intentional insulin overdose”, the court heard

After injecting her, he remained in their house until she was either semiconscious, in a coma or dead, Mr Tedeschi told the court.

Dr Crickitt’s defence counsel, Tim Gartelmann, SC, said that insulin did not cause Christine Crickitt’s death and there was no evidence that she died from the drug.

An autopsy could not determine a cause of death.

Following his wife’s death, the court was told, Dr Crickitt spent the night with Ms Livermore and the pair were seen holding hands when he visited the morgue to see his wife’s body.