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Clinton campaign hails Democratic platform


Bernie voting for Hillary

“We lost some very important fights”, Sanders told CNN’s Jake Tapper on “State of the Union”.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) on Sunday redoubled his efforts to ensure that despite his loss to presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, the legacy of his progressive campaign will endure in the party’s official platform. “We’re going to take that fight to Orlando, where the entire committee meets in two weeks, and if we don’t succeed there, we’re certainly going to take it to the floor of the Democratic convention”.

After a long and bitter primary battle, Bernie Sanders is finally saying he’ll vote for Hillary Clinton, an admission that’s got to sting his most ardent supporters.

Bernie Sanders himself had conflicting feelings about the progress and concessions made on Friday, releasing a statement on his website that said he was “pleased” with certain aspects but was “disappointed and dismayed” at other decisions, particularly those regarding trade. “We have more to do”.

Sanders, who has yet to officially suspend his Democratic presidential campaign, said he’ll continue pressing for the policies that animated his failed presidential bid before the party’s 2016 platform is locked in at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia next month.

With some polls suggesting that more than half of Sanders’s supporters would refuse to back Clinton in the general election, Sanders today urged Clinton to “Stand up, be bolder than you have been”, if she hopes to eventually attract many of his liberal supporters to her side. Making the cut were several of Sanders’ proposals, including a $15 minimum wage, the expansion of Social Security and stricter sanctions for Wall Street fraud, according to The Associated Press.

Sanders obviously enjoys the limelight and wants to be on Clinton’s good side, hence the promise to vote for her, however as long as he is a candidate he can not “support” her. Clinton’s low favorability ratings mean that Sanders voters will vote Trump over Clinton without Sanders’ endorsement.

Sanders also said Trump goes against “centuries of struggle that we have had in this country to combat discrimination”.

“Ohio reflects the broader debate that’s going on about economic uncertainty and the impact of free trade in particular”, said Jim Manley, a Democratic strategist supporting Clinton.