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Bohemian Rhapsody crosses 500 million dollar mark globally

bohemian rhapsody worldwide box office performance
bohemian rhapsody worldwide box office performance Mixed reviews did not affect Bohemian Rhapsody’s box office performance.

Bohemian Rhapsody, a biopic on the British rock band Queen, has crossed the 500 million dollar mark at the worldwide box office.

Despite mixed reviews, the Bryan Singer directorial has been showing consistent performance since its release. Starring Rami Malek as Freddie Mercury, Bohemian Rhapsody released on November 16 in India and November 2 in the United States.

Bohemian Rhapsody also stars Lucy Boynton, Gwilym Lee, Ben Hardy, Joe Mazzello, Aidan Gillen, Allen Leech, Tom Hollander and Mike Myers.

It received a 62% rating at Rotten Tomatoes. The consensus reads, “Bohemian Rhapsody hits a handful of high notes, but as an in-depth look at a beloved band, it offers more of a medley than a true greatest hits collection.”

Bohemian Rhapsody received a mixed review from The Indian Express film critic Shalini Langer. She gave it 2.5 stars and wrote, “For dramatic reasons, Bohemian Rhapsody takes several liberties with truth. Most importantly with when he revealed he had AIDS, after giving us almost guilty glimpses of the drugs-and-drinks orgies leading to it (“it’s all Pete’s fault”). In the film, he reveals he is dying just before Queen’s Live Aid concert at Wembley Stadium, billed as one of the greatest rock performances, in front of one of the biggest audiences at that time. It’s just as well. For while the star would live on for another six years, dying at the young age of 45, the concert is the high point of the film. Replicating Queen’s performance that day down to a T — just note the number of Pepsi glasses on Freddie’s piano — the film brings Freddie’s life to a big rocking finale.”

She continued, “Rami Malek puts in an astonishing bit of work getting Freddie right (especially with those teeth), and makes light work of it, his eyes reflecting the hunger the film never sweats to show. But even he can only do so much telling us what Freddie was about when the film is largely a string of his hit songs strung together.”